The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

210px-Crying_of_lot_49The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon is a postmodernist novella, published in 1966. The protagonist is Oedipa Maas who unearths the centuries-old conflict between two mail distribution companies, Thurn und Taxis and the Trystero (or Tristero). The former actually existed and was the first firm to distribute postal mail; the latter is Pynchon’s invention.

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Fun Home by Alison Bechdel

51WkgRRm22L._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel is a graphic novel memoir of the author, set in rural Pennsylvania. It focuses on Bechdel’s relationship with her father, Bruce, who was killed by a truck on July 2, 1980 when he was crossing the road. There are different versions of this story, an element of alternate endings, a postmodernist feature.  The versions include that Bruce committed suicide by purposely putting himself in front of the truck, and that something startled him and he jumped backwards to be hit; he may have been startled at the sight of a snake, one that she had once seen in the woods when she was a child.

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How to Save Your Own Life by Erica Jong

51KwcT3lvwL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_How to Save Your Own Life by Erica Jong is her second partly biographical book and a really interesting and revolutionary work on identity, gender roles, and meta-narration.

Identity of the author/narrator is distorted by the press, the strangers “who project their fantasies and frustrations on you” and those people “who envy you and imagine they would like to replace you” (8).

Narration strategies: letter writing (from a fan, Celia Laffont), play dialogue between Bennett and her when they are going to the airport to teach the Craft of Writing to Pastoral U, footnote on the F Questionnaire (75) that determines which men are safe to fuck and invented by Gretchen Kendall, list of How to Save Your Own Life / (The Wit & Wisdom of Isadora Wing) (190) and Josh’s letters to her.

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